Visitor Visa

Most people need a visa or an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) to travel to Canada – not both. Some people may only need their valid passport.
A visitor visa (also called a temporary resident visa) is an official document that the Govt. of Canada sticks in your passport. It shows that you meet the requirements needed to enter Canada.
Most travellers need a visitor visa to travel to Canada. You may also need one if you’re transiting through Canada on your way to your final destination.
You can apply for a visitor visa online or on paper.

How long you can stay

Most visitors can stay for up to 6 months in Canada.

If you don’t get a stamp in your passport, you can stay for 6 months from the day you entered Canada or until your passport expires, whichever comes first. 

Make sure you need a visitor visa before you apply

You may need a visitor visa or an Electronic Travel Authorization. The entry document you need depends on:

  • the type of travel document you plan to travel with
  • the country that issued your travel document
  • your nationality
  • your method of travel to Canada for this trip

Business Visitors

A business visitor is a foreign national who comes to Canada to participate in international business activities, but who will not enter the Canadian labour market.

Canada is one of the world’s largest economies, attracting thousands of short-term business visitors each year. With an international market-oriented economy and as a member of the Organization for Economic Co-operation (OECD) and the Group of 7 (G7), as well as a signatory to the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA, or formerly known as NAFTA), Canada strives to ensure that international business visitors can come to Canada on business trips. Subject to the nature of the work, as well as the individual’s nationality, certain business visitors can enter the country to conduct business or trade activity without needing a work permit.

One can come to Canada under Business Visitor Class if:

  • Attending business meetings, conferences, conventions, fairs, etc;
  • Buying Canadian goods or services on behalf of a foreign entity;
  • Taking orders for goods or services;
  • Providing after-sales service, excluding hands-on work in the construction trades;
  • Being trained by a Canadian parent company for work outside of Canada; and
  • Training employees of a Canadian subsidiary of a foreign company.
  • they plan to stay for less than six months,
  • they do not plan to enter the Canadian labour market,
  • the main place of business, and source of income and profits, is outside Canada,
  • they have documents that support their application and
  • they meet Canada’s basic entry requirements because they:
    • have a valid travel document, such as a passport,
    • have enough money for their stay and to return home,
    • plan to leave Canada at the end of your visit, and
    • are not a criminal, security or health risk to Canadians.